Questions

Are immigration lawyers forced to decline clients because the prospective new client is unable to pay the immigration lawyer their fee?

Do immigration lawyers implement payment plans? If so, are they comfortable with this? Are there lenders who specialize in funding sub-prime immigration clients in need of legal representation? Would immigration lawyers welcome a Lender willing to provide financing for these clients? Is a lack of financing even an issue for lawyers who work with sub-prime/thin-file/no file clients? Are there other legal professionals focused on niches other than immigration who are unable to serve this demographic?

2answers

Let's first of all position who are the audiences for an Immigration Firm. If we classified immigration into:

1- Skilled immigration (Employees), and
2- Business Immigration (Investors)

Skilled Immigration fees are affordable and due to the high competition the Professional Fees are competitive and payment plans are there to attract more clients.
HINT: Despite that, Applicants have to conduct an overall check up about the credibility of their meant immigration consultants.

On the other hand, Business Immigration which involves a bigger amounts of fees and investment are treated somehow different.
As per the country of destination and the route of immigration which is almost limited between Property Investment, Financial Instruments Investment and Donation varieties of payments plans are offered to attract Investors.
In other words, Legal Fees and Processing Fees are considered as a small portion of the Deal which doesn't shape a concern to Migrant Investors rather than the tool used for immigration and the success rate of that firm.
HINT: When choosing an immigration program it is preferable not to pick Immigration firms relying only on RCBI programs (Residency & Citizenship by Investment) as the risk lies in the project continuity as per the demand which to some extent can delay the whole immigration files under that project.


Answered 3 years ago

No.
Absolutely not.
But they should.
If they want to stay in business and be able to continue to service future immigration clients who are able to pay.


Answered 3 years ago

Unlock Startups Unlimited

Access 20,000+ Startup Experts, 650+ masterclass videos, 1,000+ in-depth guides, and all the software tools you need to launch and grow quickly.

Already a member? Sign in

Copyright © 2022 Startups.com LLC. All rights reserved.