Andrew DumontEntrepreneur in Residence at Betaworks
Bio

I bring early-stage companies scale, with 10 years of experience in revenue growth, marketing strategy, strategic partnerships, and managing high performing teams. Since my first company, which I helped create at the age of 18, I've been obsessed with the idea of taking little-known products and turning them into international brands. I've worked across all areas of the customer acquisition funnel, from awareness through retention, with a heavy emphasis on consumer internet and SaaS. I’ve spoken on digital innovation around the globe at shows like SMX, Inbound Marketing Summit, ionSearch, New Media Expo, Ignite, AdTech, and more. I hold a degree in Finance and Marketing from Western Washington University, received my executive education at Stanford University, and was named to the Forbes 30 Under 30 list in 2014.



Recent Answers


If it's SaaS, you should be monetizing from day one. An MVP in SaaS is the minimal product that people will pay for, that's the starting point. You evolved the product from there.

If it's a consumer app, that's a little more complicated. Often times, monetizing preemptively can stunt growth and kill the trajectory, due to lack of focus, user experience, etc. It's really a question of access to capital in this scenario.


Why pitch him anything? It sounds like what your offering isn't in his sweet spot, so instead of pitching, why don't you think of the meeting as a fact-finding exercise?

You can learn a lot about what someone wants by removing your agenda, asking meaningful questions and listening.


This may not give you exactly what you need, but Entrepreneur.com has a good collection of startup-related documents: http://www.entrepreneur.com/formnet/index.html

You may be able to use something here as a starting point.


There's nothing wrong with an exclusive, it gives you an opportunity to execute well and align a strong public announcement with a high-profile client, if picked correctly.

However, six months is a little long. Typically, an exclusive like this is more along the lines of three months than six. In any negotiation, there's a side with more leverage, which I'm not able to determine with the limited information that I have. If it's you, I would pick what means more to you: A six month exclusive with more revenue or a 3 month exclusive with less and negotiate to that point.


Contact on Clarity

$ 5.00 /min

5.00Rating
Schedule a Call

Send Message

Stats

4

Answers
Calls


Access Startup Experts

Connect with over 20,000 Startup Experts to answer your questions.

Learn More

Copyright © 2020 Startups.com LLC. All rights reserved.